Monday 19th September 1944

2nd Day

"At about 10 o'clock fighters started passing overhead. We pointed them out to each other and soon the usual argument started. "They are Spits". "don't be an ass as anyone can see they are Typhoons".  "Are they hell!"

I kept quit as usual when Aircraft Recce is discussed, completely fascinated how anyone can be so clever as to distinguished one fighter from another at any distance over 1.000feet. I was terrible pleased to be able to join the discussion effectively by pointing out that they were German."

 

"Bullets were hitting ahead of us, until some fools started firing at them with a Bren. Our casualties were light and not one of our flight was hit".

(Arnhem Lift page 18)


Towards Arnhem

 Attack by 156 Parachute Battalion and Gliderpilots on Lichtenbeek area/De koepel/point 56.5. (Collection P. Reinders)
Attack by 156 Parachute Battalion and Gliderpilots on Lichtenbeek area/De koepel/point 56.5. (Collection P. Reinders)

" I told the parachute officer about the bad morale of  the Germans and if he attacked now he would be sure to bowl them over. I vaguely heard engine noises from the German side and then a terrfic crash and black smoke and san flew up in the air, the Germans where using tanks or self-propelled guns. The second shot went straight into our line of attack and six men on the left flank were knocked out. There was nothing to do but retire to our orginal position, and I linked up with our flight who were digging in on the rear slopes of the hill.

They told me they had four casualties when we started our first attack, and that out Lieutenant was still out there in the brushwood seriously injured.   (Arnhem Lift, page 22.

German Half track (Sfdzk 251) at the Dreyenseweg (Bundesarchive)
German Half track (Sfdzk 251) at the Dreyenseweg (Bundesarchive)

"I searched  the brushwood ,I found him at last, but he was dead and it was not worth while getting the other chaps along to pull him out. We would definitely have casualties doing so.

(Arnhem Lift, page 23.


Wolfheze again

Wolfheze station (collection P. Reinders)
Wolfheze station (collection P. Reinders)

"Most of the chaps felt that this was too uncertain and the silence depressed them. They said they would return to Wolfheze and I didn't argue as I ddo not want to be responsible for them. This move of mine was purely instinctive and there was no plan or reason attached it. only Dodd (Sgt  W. Dodd 22 Flight) stayed with me, and we carried on along the lonely road. I never saw any of the people I left in Wolfheze again.  We walked on just inside the woods, never losing sight of the main road. Just as it was getting dusk a string of jeeps came racing along. (likely area Bilderberglaan/Nico Bovenweg,Oosterbeek).

We hailed them it was a Reconnaissance Patrol and they were glad to take us as they had some casualties and their number needed making up.  We raced  through the woods at sixty miles an hour, sitting sideways on the jeeps and covering  the woods on either side with our guns. We were lucky and got right through to the Recce HQ.  I got myself a sten gun, plenty of filled mags and had a whole night sleep in my slit trench. (Arnhem Lift, page 25)


Fieldgraves at the Oranjeweg, Oosterbeek
Fieldgraves at the Oranjeweg, Oosterbeek